Acupuncture

Provider for: Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield, Land Mark, Optum Health, GHI, PHCH, Multi Plan, Aetna, United Health Care

AcupunctureFINGERNAIL & TONGUE ANALYSIS
The relationship of the tongue to the organs of the body can determine a patient’s health condition. The tongue relates to the 5-element system by analyzing the color, shape, vitality, coating and moisture level as well as examining the veins underneath the tongue for toxins in the body.A person’s tongue is a consistent health tool to help examine their health, as well as their health progression. A healthy person should have eight lunular (small moon like white areas at the bottom of the nails.) The presence of the lunular represents the mitochondrial oxygen transport system. It extends to a particular meridian line, to an area of the body it represents. Ridges, colors, shape and spots are all observed in this analysis.

AcupunctureACUPUNCTURE
Consultation $120
Acupuncture $80
Acupuncture is an ancient form of Chinese medicine involving the insertion of solid fusiform acupuncture needles into the skin at specific points on the body to achieve a therapeutic effect. No drug is injected. The needles alone create the beneficial effects of acupuncture. Acupuncture is used to encourage natural healing, improve mood and energy, reduce or relieve pain and improve function of affected areas of the body. It is safe and effective and is often successfully used as an alternative to medications. Acupuncture needles are solid, usually stainless steel (they may also be gold or silver), and measure from 13-70 mm. The needles are very fine, flexible and rounded but sharp at the tip. They are “a traumatic”, meaning that they do not have a cutting edge like a hypodermic needle, which slices through tissue. Their design allows acupuncture needles to slide smoothly through tissues and makes them unlikely to cause bleeding or damage to underlying structures. A dull, heavy, or aching feeling often occurs when the needle is correctly placed. This is referred to as “de Qi” and is considered by some traditional acupuncturists to be necessary for acupuncture to be effective. The needles are left in place for 15-30 minutes, and the practitioner may manipulate the needles to strengthen or reduce the flow of Qi. Lifting, twisting, and rotating are some of the needling techniques a practitioner may use.

Other related techniques:
Electro-acupuncture: needles are electrically stimulated by various frequencies and voltages by attachment to a battery-powered machine using wires with small clips on the ends. Low frequency stimulation (2-4 Hz) results in a slow onset of pain relief that outlasts the treatment for hours to days and is often cumulative by repeating treatments. High frequency stimulation (80-200 Hz) results in a pain-blocking effect that is fast in onset but does not usually outlast the stimulation.

Acupressure: a technique involving pressure on acupuncture points using the thumbs or fingers, capable of giving relief of symptoms in responsive individuals

What is Acupuncture Points?
Acupuncture points (also called acupoints) are locations on the body that are the focus of acupuncture, acupressure. Several hundred acupuncture points are located, it is considered, along meridians (connected points across the anatomy which affect a specific organ or other part of the body). There are also numerous “extra points” not associated with a particular meridian. Acupuncture points have a lower resistance to the passage of electricity than the surrounding skin and are part of a network of points that were mapped centuries ago by the Chinese. Most are found along “meridians” or “channels” that are believed to be the pathways by which energy or Qi (pronounced “Chee”) flows through the body. Acupoints are located either by identifying anatomical landmarks or by the classical method (for example: “the point where the middle finger touches the thigh when standing at attention”). Traditional Chinese medicine’s acupuncture theory predates scientific method. There is no known anatomical or histological basis for the existence of acupuncture points or meridians. Acupuncturists tend to perceive traditional Chinese medicine in functional rather than structural terms, i.e. as being useful in guiding evaluation and care of patients.[ The findings of a 2005 systematic review of the effects of acupuncture on brain activation as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography were summarized as follows: “These studies show that specific and largely predictable areas of brain activation and deactivation occur when considering the traditional Chinese functions attributable to certain specific acupuncture points. For example, points associated with hearing and vision stimulates the visual and auditory cerebral areas respectively.”

What does acupuncture treat?
According to the National Institutes of Health there are currently more than 10 million adults in the U.S. that have used acupuncture at some time in the past, or are using it currently people go to acupuncturists for treatment of AIDS, allergies, arthritis, asthma, Bell’s palsy, bladder and kidney problems, breast enlargement, bronchitis, colds, constipation, cosmetics, depression, diarrhea, dizziness, drug addiction (cocaine, heroin), epilepsy, fatigue, fertility problems, fibromyalgia, flu, gynecologic disorders, headaches, high blood pressure, hot flushes, irritable bowel syndrome, migraines, nausea, nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting), pain, paralysis, post-traumatic stress disorder, PMS, sciatica, sexual dysfunction, sinus problems, smoking, stress, stroke, tendonitis, vision problems, and just about anything else that might ail a human being.

Is Acupuncture safe?
Because acupuncture needles penetrate the skin, many forms of acupuncture are invasive procedures, and therefore not without risk. Injuries are rare among patients treated by trained practitioners. In most jurisdictions, needles are required by law to be sterile, disposable and used only once.
Commenting on the relative safety of acupuncture compared with other treatments, the diverse side effects of acupuncture are extremely low. The incidence of adverse effects is substantially lower than that of many drugs or other accepted medical procedures used for the same condition. For example, musculoskeletal conditions, such as fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, and tennis elbow… are conditions for which acupuncture may be beneficial.

CUPPING $50
Cupping is one of the oldest methods of traditional Chinese Medicine. The earliest recorded use of cupping, dates to the early fourth century, when the noted herbalist Ge Hong wrote about a form of cupping in A Handbook of Prescriptions. Later books written during the Tang and Qing dynasties described cupping in great detail; one textbook included an entire chapter on “fire jar qi”, a type of cupping that could alleviate headaches, dizziness and abdominal pain.
Originally, practitioners would use hollowed-out animal horns for cups, and place them over particular points or meridians. Today, most acupuncturists use cups made of thick glass or plastic, although bamboo, iron and pottery cups are still used in other countries. Glass cups are the preferred method of delivery, because they do not break as easily as pottery or deteriorate like bamboo, and they allow the acupuncturist to see the skin and evaluate the effects of treatment.

How does cupping work?
In a typical cupping session, glass cups are warmed using a cotton ball or other flammable substance, which is soaked in alcohol, let, then placed inside the cup. Burning a substance inside the cup removes all the oxygen, which creates a vacuum. As the substance burns, the cup is turned upside-down so that the practitioner can place the cup over a specific area. The vacuum created by the lack of oxygen anchors the cup to the skin and pulls it upward on the inside of the glass as the air inside the jar cools. Drawing up the skin is believed to open up the skin’s pores, which helps to stimulate the flow of blood, balances and realigns the flow of qi, breaks up obstructions, and creates an avenue for toxins to be drawn out of the body. Depending on the condition being treated, the cups will be left in place from 5 to 10 minutes. Several cups may be placed on a patient’s body at the same time. Some practitioners will also apply small amounts of medicated oils or herbal oils to the skin just before the cupping procedure, which lets them move the cups up and down particular acupoints or meridians after they have been applied. In addition to the traditional form of cupping described above, which is known as “dry” cupping, some practitioners also use what is called “wet” or “air” cupping. In “air” cupping, instead of using a flame to heat the cup, the cup is applied to the skin, and a suction pump is attached to the rounded end of the jar. The pump is then used to create the vacuum. In “wet” cupping, the skin is punctured before treatment. When the cup is applied and the skin is drawn up, a small amount of blood may flow from the puncture site, which are believed to help remove harmful substances and toxins from the body.

What does cupping treat?
In China, cupping is used primarily to treat respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, asthma, and congestion; arthritis; gastrointestinal disorders; and certain types of pain. Some practitioners also use cupping to treat depression and reduce swelling. Fleshy sites on the body, such as the back and stomach (and, to a lesser extent, the arms and legs), are the preferred sites for treatment.

Is Cupping Safe?
While cupping is considered relatively safe (especially air cupping, which does not include the risk of fire and heat), it can cause some swelling and bruising on the skin. As the skin under a cup is drawn up, the blood vessels at the surface of the skin expand. This may result in small, circular bruises on the areas where the cups were applied. These bruises are usually painless, however, and disappear within a few days of treatment. In addition, there are several instances where cupping should not be performed. Patients with inflamed skin, high fever or convulsions and patients who bleed easily, are not suitable candidates for cupping. Pregnant women should not have cupping on their stomach or lower back. If the cups are being moved, they should not cross bony areas, such as the ridges of the spine or the shoulder blades.

INFRA- THERAPY $50
Infra-therapy is used to treat stress, chronic pain, repair damaged tissues, body detox, as well as to eliminate cellulite and lose weight. Infra-therapy uses infrared waves whose various benefic actions have been noted by many health experts. The strength of this technology is the invisible radiation that allows a resonance of muscle tissue, increases blood circulation, improves the cardiovascular, immune systems and cellular function.

NOTE: It is necessary to be diagnosed by a physician for the following conditions prior to treatment with acupuncture. We recommend you follow up with your physician during or after acupuncture treatments when appropriate. Our philosophy is to have alternative/complementary medicine working together with western medicine to provide you with the best care possible.

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